A novel topological insulator

For the first time, physicists have built a unique topological insulator in which optical and electronic excitations hybridize and flow together. They report their discovery in Nature.

Researchers observe electrons zipping around in crystals

The end of the silicon age has begun. As computer chips approach the physical limits of miniaturization and power-hungry processors drive up energy costs, scientists are looking to a new crop of exotic materials that could ...

Electrons in the water

It's a popular tradition to throw coins into fountains in the hopes of having wishes granted. But what would happen if you could "throw" electrons into the water instead? That is, what happens shortly after an electron is ...

The electronic origins of fluorescence in carbon nanotubes

Technological progress is often driven by materials science. High-tech devices require "smart" materials that combine a range of properties. An impressive current example is carbon nanotubes (CNTs)—single sheets of carbon ...

The microscopic origin of efficiency droop in LEDs

Light-emitting diodes—or LEDs, as they are commonly known—have been slowly replacing incandescent light bulbs in applications ranging from car taillights to indicators on electronics since their invention in the 1960s.

Twisting molecule wrings more power from solar cells

Inside a solar cell, sunlight excites electrons. But these electrons often don't last long enough to go on to power cell phones or warm homes. In a promising new type of solar cell, the solar-excited electrons have better ...

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