Why skinks that lost their legs evolved new ones

A team of researchers affiliated with Clark University, the Museum of Natural History, Yale University and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has developed a theory to explain why skinks living in the Philippines lost ...

A new mathematical front to understand species coexistence

How biodiversity is generated and maintained are central questions in science, which are becoming increasingly important for our quality of life. How do similar species coexist in a system? Which ones will dominate or be ...

Mutations that affect aging: More common than we thought?

The number of mutations that can contribute to aging may be significantly higher than previously believed, according to new research on fruit flies. The study by scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, supports a new ...

Scientists develop topological barcodes for folded molecules

The team of Alireza Mashaghi at the Leiden Academic Center for Drug Research has found a way to determine and classify the shape of proteins. Their new theory defines the topology of proteins as a simple and precise barcode ...

How boundaries become bridges in evolution

There's a paradox within the theory of evolution: The life forms that exist today are here because they were able to change when past environments disappeared. Yet, organisms evolve to fit into specific environmental niches.

Why do humans prefer to mate in private?

Yitzchak Ben Mocha, an anthropologist with Zürich University, has conducted a study of human procreation habits as part of an effort to understand why humans prefer to mate in private. In his paper published in the journal ...

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