How superstitions spread

Ancient Roman leaders once made decisions about important events, such as when to hold elections or where to build new cities, based on the presence or flight patterns of birds. Builders often omit the thirteenth floor from ...

The evolution of lethal fighting in a spider mite

While fighting over females is common among male animals in the wild, these fights rarely result in death. You can't pass on your genes when you're dead or badly injured. So why do the males in some colonies of the tiny spider ...

Aliens may be more like us than we think

Hollywood films and science fiction literature fuel the belief that aliens are other-worldly, monster-like beings, who are very different to humans. But new research suggests that we could have more in common with our extra-terrestrial ...

Distant fish relatives share looks

James Cook University scientists have found evidence that even distantly related Australian fish species have evolved to look and act like each other, which confirms a central tenet of evolutionary theory.

Alpha leaders tend to be front-runner candidates

The tenets of Social Darwinism may have lost favor long ago, but the rise of political populism in the 21st Century continues to support the maxim that "the strong survive", and are most adept at leading during challenging ...

Outnumbered and on others' turf, misfits sometimes thrive

It's hard being a misfit: say, a Yankees fan in a room full of Red Sox fans or a vegetarian at a barbecue joint. Evolutionary biologists have long assumed that's pretty much how things work in nature too. Animals that wander ...

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