Related topics: patients

Researchers reveal cellular diversity of esophageal tissue

In a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University defined 11 subsets of cells found in the esophagus of mice, information that could potentially ...

Why do some dogs need high chairs, and how can genetics help?

Some dogs have to eat in a high chair—or, more specifically, a Bailey Chair. The chair keeps them in a vertical position while they eat so that gravity can do the work their bodies can't: moving food from the mouth to the ...

Esophagus

The esophagus (or oesophagus) is an organ in vertebrates which consists of a muscular tube through which food passes from the pharynx to the stomach. During swallowing, food passes from the mouth through the pharynx into the esophagus and travels via peristalsis to the stomach. The word esophagus is derived from the Latin œsophagus, which derives from the Greek word oisophagos , lit. "entrance for eating." In humans the esophagus is continuous with the laryngeal part of the pharynx at the level of the C6 vertebra. The esophagus passes through posterior mediastinum in thorax and enters abdomen through a hole in the diaphragm at the level of the tenth thoracic vertebrae (T10). It is usually about 25–30 cm long depending on individual height. It is divided into cervical, thoracic and abdominal parts. Due to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle, the entry to the esophagus opens only when swallowing or vomiting.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA