Related topics: cells · cancer cells · protein

Extracellular forces help epithelial cells stick together

Different surfaces and organs of the body are covered by epithelial tissue, which is composed of cells tightly connected to each other. The cells can be attached through junctions that are in direct contact with the cytoskeletal ...

Images reveal how bacteria form communities on the human tongue

Using a recently developed fluorescent imaging technique, researchers in the United States have developed high-resolution maps of microbial communities on the human tongue. The images, presented March 24 in the journal Cell ...

More efficient risk assessment for nanomaterials

Nanotechnology is booming, but risk assessment for these tiny particles is a laborious process that presents significant challenges to the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). To find more efficient test methods, ...

Space travel can make the gut leaky

Bacteria, fungi, and viruses can enter our gut through the food we eat. Fortunately, the epithelial cells that line our intestines serve as a robust barrier to prevent these microorganisms from invading the rest of our bodies.

Dental stem cells can generate milk-producing cells

Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate ...

Caught in the act: Proteins responsible for metastasis

Research by Assoc. Prof. Nurhan Özlü of Koç University Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and her team, recently published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, has uncovered the effects of two proteins in the ...

Size matters: How cells pack in epithelial tissues

Small-cell clones in proliferating epithelia—tissues that line all body surfaces—organize very differently than their normal-sized counterparts, according to a recent study from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research. ...

The art of worming through tight spaces

How active matter, such as assemblages of bacterial or epithelial cells, manages to expand into narrow spaces largely depends on their growth dynamics, as LMU physicists demonstrate in a newly published study.

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Epithelium

In biology and medicine, an epithelium is a tissue composed of cells that line the cavities and surfaces of structures throughout the body. Many glands are also formed from epithelial tissue. It lies on top of connective tissue, and the two layers are separated by a basement membrane.

In humans, epithelium is classified as a primary body tissue, the other ones being connective tissue, muscle tissue and nervous tissue.

Epithelium is often defined by the expression of the adhesion molecule e-cadherin (as opposed to n-cadherin, which is used by cells of the connective tissue).

Functions of epithelial cells include secretion, selective absorption, protection, transcellular transport and detection of sensation and they commonly as a result present extensive apical-basolateral polarity (e.g. different membrane proteins expressed) and specialisation.

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