Africa faces grave risks as COVID-19 emerges, says economist

The first cases of COVID-19 emerged in China last November, and the virus has since moved inexorably to Europe and the United States. The virus didn't arrive in Africa—home to 1.2 billion people—until the end of February, ...

Telecommuting could curb the coronavirus epidemic

Recent surveys from both the National Household Transportation Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicate that around 29% of the United States workforce has the option to work at home, and around 15% usually does ...

Coronavirus: Economist sees sharp, short-lived effects

Gabriel Ehrlich is the director of the Research Seminar in Quantitative Economics at the University of Michigan, where he forecasts the U.S. and Michigan economies. He discusses the economic impact of the coronavirus locally, ...

Scientists create model to predict multipathogen epidemics

Diseases often pile on, coinfecting people, animals and other organisms that are already fighting an infection. In one of the first studies of its kind, bioscientists from Rice University and the University of Michigan have ...

To predict an epidemic, evolution can't be ignored

When scientists try to predict the spread of something across populations—anything from a coronavirus to misinformation—they use complex mathematical models to do so. Typically, they'll study the first few steps in which ...

New report reveals 'epidemic' levels of crime in shops

A hard-hitting new report calls on action to stem the rising number of crimes against shop workers, which has hit a five-year high, and highlights workers suffering with post-traumatic stress disorder, more commonly seen ...

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Epidemic

In epidemiology, an epidemic (from Greek epi- upon + demos people) occurs when new cases of a certain disease, in a given human population, and during a given period, substantially exceed what is "expected," based on recent experience (the number of new cases in the population during a specified period of time is called the "incidence rate"). (An epizootic is the analogous circumstance within an animal population.) In recent usages, the disease is not required to be communicable; examples include cancer or heart disease.

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