A recording device for cell history

ETH researchers are using the CRISPR-Cas system to develop a novel recording mechanism: The snippets of DNA it produces can provide information about certain cellular processes. In the future, this cellular memory might even ...

Can environmental toxins disrupt the biological 'clock'?

Can environmental toxins disrupt circadian rhythms - the biological "clock" whose disturbance is linked to chronic inflammation and a host of human disorders? Research showing a link between circadian disruption and plankton ...

How molecular riboswitches work in bacteria

Many bacteria have molecular control elements via which they can switch genes on and off. These riboswitches also open up new options in the development of antibiotics or the detection and decomposition of environmental toxins. ...

Making new functional polymers for 3-D printers

Chemical engineers at the University of Melbourne have found a way to 3-D print smart polymers (or plastics) that can perform a function, in a way that is cheaper, cleaner and more accessible than ever before.

Farming amoebae carry around detoxifying food

Humans aren't the only farmers out there. Five years ago, the Queller-Strassmann lab at Rice University, now at Washington University in St. Louis, demonstrated that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum—affectionately ...

Even bacteria use social networks

The next time your Facebook stream is filled with cat videos, think about Myxococcus xanthus. The single-cell soil bacterium also uses a social network. But forget silly distractions. M. xanthus relies on its connections ...

Cradle turns smartphone into handheld biosensor

(Phys.org) —Researchers and physicians in the field could soon run on-the-spot tests for environmental toxins, medical diagnostics, food safety and more with their smartphones.

Nanosponge filters out herbicide poisons

(Phys.org)—New research has demonstrated the potential of a new kind of nanomaterial to filter out environmental toxins in water.

Glowing flowers for ultra-trace analysis of TNT

(Phys.org)—Highly sensitive and highly selective tests are important for the early detection of disease, the detection of environmental toxins, or for the detection of explosives at airports. Increased selectivity for the ...

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