How our brains influence language change

Our language is changing constantly. Researchers of the University of Vienna found that, over centuries, frequently occurring speech sound patterns get even more frequent. The reason for this development is that our brain ...

Identifying the basic structure of the language of fungi

Andrew Adamatzk, a professor at the University of the West of England's Unconventional Computing Laboratory, UWE, in the U.K. has found that the electrical signal clusters sent by several types of fungi resemble human vocabularies. ...

Authors use they/them pronouns less frequently in publications

More people are using "they/them" pronouns to signal their gender identity, but writers tend to avoid using "they" to refer to a single person, according to a new study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Non-English-language science could help save biodiversity

It is commonly assumed that any important scientific knowledge would be available in English, and so scientific knowledge used in international studies is predominantly sourced from English-language documents. But is this ...

page 2 from 14