Indonesia ships back tonnes of Australian waste

Indonesia has shipped tonnes of Australian garbage out of the country, an official said Tuesday, as Southeast Asian nations push back against serving as dumping grounds for foreign trash.

Scientists create atomic scale, 2-D electronic kagome lattice

Scientists from the University of Wollongong (UOW), working with colleagues at China's Beihang University, Nankai University, and Institute of Physics at Chinese Academy of Sciences, have successfully created an atomic scale, ...

Ahead of US election, angst over hacking threats

At a Boston technology conference last month, computer scientist Alex Halderman showed how easy it was to hack into an electronic voting machine and change the result, without leaving a trace.

Art of paper-cutting inspires self-charging paper device

Despite the many advances in portable electronic devices, one thing remains constant: the need to plug them into a wall socket to recharge. Now researchers, reporting in the journal ACS Nano, have developed a light-weight, ...

Online voting is a danger to democracy, says computer scientist

If, like a growing number of people, you're willing to trust the internet to safeguard your finances, shepherd your love life, and maybe even steer your car, being able to cast your vote online might seem like a logical, ...

page 1 from 5

Electronic paper

Electronic paper, also called e-paper or electronic ink display is a display technology designed to mimic the appearance of ordinary ink on paper. Unlike a conventional flat panel display, which uses a backlight to illuminate its pixels, electronic paper reflects light like ordinary paper and is capable of holding text and images indefinitely without drawing electricity, while allowing the image to be changed later.

To build e-paper, several different technologies exist, some using plastic substrate and electronics so that the display is flexible. E-paper is considered more comfortable to read than conventional displays. This is due to the stable image, which does not need to be refreshed constantly, the wider viewing angle, and the fact that it reflects ambient light rather than emitting its own light. An e-paper display can be read in direct sunlight without the image fading. Lightweight and durable, e-paper can currently provide only a monochrome display, e.g., black on white. The contrast ratio in available displays as of 2008 might be described as similar to that of newspaper, though newly-developed implementations are slightly better. There is ongoing competition among manufacturers to provide full-color capability.

Applications include electronic pricing labels in retail shops, and general signage, time tables at bus stations, electronic billboards, the mobile phone Motorola FONE F3, and e-book readers capable of displaying digital versions of books and e-paper magazines.

Electronic paper should not be confused with digital paper, which is a pad to create handwritten digital documents with a digital pen.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA