Related topics: electrons · brain

Chili-shaped device could reveal just how hot that pepper is

Some people love spicy food—the hotter, the better. Others go out of their way to avoid the palate-singeing burn of capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their kick. Now, researchers have developed a portable ...

Pinning down the ampere with a supersensitive particle detector

From light bulbs to cell phones, all electronic devices in everyday life rely on the flow of electrons to function. Just as scientists use meters to describe the length of an object or seconds to measure the passage of time, ...

New device powers wearable sensors through human motion

The advent of inexpensive wearable sensors that can monitor heart rate and body temperature, as well as levels of blood sugar and metabolic byproducts, has allowed researchers and health professionals to monitor human health ...

Superconductor technology for smaller, sooner fusion

Scientists have long sought to harness fusion as an inexhaustible and carbon-free energy source. Within the past few years, groundbreaking high-temperature superconductor technology (HTS) sparked a new vision for achieving ...

Using electric current to stabilize low-permeability soils

According to EU Science Hub, increasingly frequent extreme weather events will cause intensifying damage to infrastructure, with losses estimated to reach €20 billion annually by 2030. These pressing threats bring into ...

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Electric current

Electric current is the rate of flow of electric charge. The electric charge that flows is carried by, for example, mobile electrons in a conductor, ions in an electrolyte or both in a plasma.

The SI unit of electric current intensity is the ampere. Electric current is measured using an ammeter.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA