Related topics: electrons

Researchers use laser light to transform metal into magnet

Pioneering physicists from the University of Copenhagen and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have discovered a way to get non-magnetic materials to make themselves magnetic by way of laser light. The phenomenon ...

Cable bacteria: Living electrical wires with record conductivity

A team of scientists from the University of Antwerp (Belgium), Delft University of Technology (Netherlands) and the University of Hasselt (Belgium) have reported on bacteria that power themselves using electricity and can ...

Getting a look under the hood of topological insulators

Certain materials, like copper, conduct electricity very well. Other materials, like glass, do not. A certain kind of material, called a topological insulator, acts partially like one and partially like the other ― it ...

Researchers create breathalyzer that can detect marijuana

As recreational marijuana legalization becomes more widespread throughout the U.S., so has concern about what that means for enforcing DUI laws. Unlike a breathalyzer used to detect alcohol, police do not have a device that ...

Fat pumps generate electrical power

A previously unknown electrical current develops in the body's cells when the vital fat pump function of the flippases transfers ("flips") lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the body's cell membranes. This electrical ...

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Electric current

Electric current is the rate of flow of electric charge. The electric charge that flows is carried by, for example, mobile electrons in a conductor, ions in an electrolyte or both in a plasma.

The SI unit of electric current intensity is the ampere. Electric current is measured using an ammeter.

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