Related topics: electrons

Double layer of graphene helps to control spin currents

In order to make transistors that operate using the spin of electrons rather than their charge, it is necessary to find a way of switching spin currents on and off. Furthermore, the lifetime of the spins should at least be ...

The nano-guitar string that plays itself

Scientists at Lancaster University and the University of Oxford have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force.

Photocatalytic hydrogen production from water

NUS chemists have developed carbon-conjugated covalent organic frameworks for visible light-driven catalytic production of hydrogen gas from water.

Axion particle spotted in solid-state crystal

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Princeton University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spotted a ...

Inventing the world's strongest silver

A team of scientists has made the strongest silver ever—42 percent stronger than the previous world record. But that's not the important point.

Researchers use laser light to transform metal into magnet

Pioneering physicists from the University of Copenhagen and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have discovered a way to get non-magnetic materials to make themselves magnetic by way of laser light. The phenomenon ...

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Electric current

Electric current is the rate of flow of electric charge. The electric charge that flows is carried by, for example, mobile electrons in a conductor, ions in an electrolyte or both in a plasma.

The SI unit of electric current intensity is the ampere. Electric current is measured using an ammeter.

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