Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria

A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote "good" bacteria over "bad"—with potential benefits for human health.

Urban biodiversity to lower chronic disease

Replanting urban environments with native flora could be a cost effective way to improve public health because it will help 'rewild' the environmental and human microbiota, University of Adelaide researchers say.

Courage to aim for less cleanliness?

Do the same laws of biodiversity which apply in nature also apply to our own bodies and homes? If so, current hygiene measures to combat aggressive germs could be, to some extent, counterproductive. So writes an interdisciplinary ...

College textbooks largely overlook the most common animals

A recent study of textbooks aimed at introductory biology courses finds that they devote less than one percent of their text to discussing insects, which make up more than 60 percent of animal species. The study authors argue ...

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