Microscopic chariots deliver molecules within our cells

On the cellular highway, motor proteins called dyneins rule the road. Dyneins "walk" along structures called microtubules to deliver cellular cargo, such as signaling molecules and organelles, to different parts of a cell. ...

Transport of molecular motors into cilia

Molecular motors produce the force that powers the beat of sperm cell tails to generate movement toward the egg cell for fertilization. New research now shows how the molecular motors that power the movement of sperm cells ...

Dissecting the brain's primary developmental engine

(Phys.org) —Last month, researchers reported the creation of the first primitive brain-like structures made from human stem cells. To create the complex morphology of these cerebral organoids, cells within a proliferating ...

Bearing witness to the phenomenon of symmetric cell division

Writing in his journal about the scientists of his era, Henry David Thoreau bemoaned their blindness to significant phenomena: "The question is not what you look at, but what you see." More than 150 years later, his words ...

From wimp to jock: How a cell motor gets pushy

A University of Utah researcher helped discover how a "wimpy" protein motor works with two other proteins to gain the strength necessary to move nerve cells and components inside them. The findings shed light on brain development ...

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Dynein

Dynein is a motor protein (also called molecular motor or motor molecule) in cells which converts the chemical energy contained in ATP into the mechanical energy of movement. Dynein transports various cellular cargo by "walking" along cytoskeletal microtubules towards the minus-end of the microtubule, which is usually oriented towards the cell center. Thus, they are called "minus-end directed motors," while kinesins, motor proteins that move toward the microtubules' plus end, are called plus-end directed motors.

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