Why wasn't the human genome shredded long ago?

In the January 7th edition of Communications Biology, researchers at InsideOutBio argue that an unusual form of DNA with a reverse twist may have helped thwart the invasion of the human genome by junk DNA. This mechanism ...

Can you evolve while being robust?

It was long thought that DNA, together with the genes encoded in it, determined genetic destiny. But equally important is coordinating when genes are turned on and off. In fact, the regulation of gene expression defines life ...

Genetic risk factor for equine eye cancer identified

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common cancer found in equine eyes and the second most common tumor of the horse overall. Thanks to a recent genetic study led by UC Davis, horse owners can now identify horses at ...

Breaking the protein-DNA bond

The verdict is in: too many single, flirty proteins can break up a strong relationship.

Scientists reveal hidden structures in bacterial DNA

DNA contains the instructions for life, encoded within genes. Within all cells, DNA is organised into very long lengths known as chromosomes. In animal and plant cells these are double-ended, like pieces of string or shoelaces, ...

SMiLE-seq: A new technique speeds up genetics

Scientists at EPFL have developed a technique that can be a game-changer for genetics by making the characterization of DNA-binding proteins much faster, more accurate, and efficient.

Scientists publish the first RNA interactome of the human nucleus

Studying sequence and function of DNA has been in the focus of life sciences for decades, but now the interest of many researchers has turned to the RNA. Today, many scientists believe that RNA molecules, together with a ...

A new way of fighting bacteria?

In bacteria, toxin-antitoxin systems consist of a set of two closely linked genes. Situated on the same chromosome, they encode both a protein 'poison' and a counteracting 'antidote'. Under normal conditions, the antitoxin ...

DNA division can slow to a halt

A key mystery of the DNA replication process has been unraveled by researchers from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).

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