Dinosaur egg bonanza gives vital clues about prehistoric parenting

Perhaps the most amazing thing about fossils is that they don't just show us what extinct animals looked like, they can also reveal how those animals lived. Even a fossilized dinosaur egg can provide a wealth of clues about ...

Medullary bone found in Cretaceous birds

A team of scientists led by Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported the first occurrence of medullary bone in Enantiornithes, the ...

Why birds don't have teeth

Why did birds lose their teeth? Was it so they would be lighter in the air? Or are pointy beaks better for worm-eating than the jagged jaws of dinosaur ancestors?

How does a one-tonne dino hatch its eggs? Carefully

Most dinosaurs buried their eggs and hoped for the best, but some species—including a few hefty ones—built nests and pampered unhatched offspring much as birds do today, researchers reported Wednesday.

Non-avian dinosaur found to have laid blue eggs

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Germany and the U.S. has found that a non-avian dinosaur living in what is now China laid colored eggs. In their paper published on the peer-reviewed site PeerJ, the team describes ...

Brooding dinosaurs

A new method used to perform geochemical analysis of fossilized eggs from China has shown that oviraptorosaurs incubated their eggs with their bodies within a 35–40° C range, similar to extant birds today. This finding ...

Bird-like dinosaurs hatched eggs like chickens: study

Feathered dinosaurs that walked on two legs and had parrot-like beaks shared another characteristic with modern birds—they brooded clutches of eggs at a temperature similar to chickens, a study showed Wednesday.

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