Cryptography without using secret keys

Most security applications, for instance, access to buildings or digital signatures, use cryptographic keys that must at all costs be kept secret. That also is the weak link: Who will guarantee that the key doesn't get stolen ...

Building trust in artificial intelligence

From telecommunications to road traffic, from healthcare to the workplace—digital technology is now an intrinsic part of almost every area of life. Yet how can we ensure that developments in this field, especially those ...

Tracking security staff at large-scale events

Spectacular fireworks, a large crowd, and music with a driving beat—on the first weekend in May the Rhine in Flames event will set the large parks along the Rhine in Bonn topsy-turvy. In 2019, a team of researchers from ...

WhatsApp, security and spyware: what happened

Facebook-owned WhatsApp's revelation of a security flaw allowing hackers to inject spyware on smartphones raised fresh concerns about the security of the mobile ecosystem.

Transforming the art industry with Blockchain

Sometimes an art forgery is so sophisticated, it fools even the experts. For example, in 2011, Sotheby's brokered a deal for a darkly coloured gentleman's portrait said to be by 17th century painter Frans Hals the Elder. ...

Australia anti-encryption law rushed to passage

A newly enacted law rushed through Australia's parliament will compel technology companies such as Apple, Facebook and Google to disable encryption protections so police can better pursue terrorists and other criminals.

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