Prehistoric teeth give up their secrets

The isotope values of food consumed are reflected in the individual's tissues. As bone is constantly being turned over by remodelling, analysing the stable isotope ratios of bone collagen can shine a light on the main dietary ...

Got starch? There's bacteria in your gut for that

Soft foods like white bread and rice might seem like an easy thing for your body to digest, but a tiny organism in your gut is actually responsible for chowing down some types of starch and turning it into nutrients your ...

Electron microscope images reveal how cells absorb a vital mineral

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have obtained the first detailed snapshots of the structure of a membrane pore that enables epithelial cells to absorb calcium. The findings could accelerate the development ...

Video: How will climate change impact ocean health?

The oceans provide one quarter of the world's dietary protein, yet we have little understanding of how changes in ocean temperatures and chemistry will impact ocean life, from microbes to coral reefs to commercial fish stocks, ...

Global warming reduces protein in key crops: study

Rising carbon dioxide levels from global warming will drastically reduce the amount of protein in staple crops like rice and wheat, leaving vulnerable populations at risk of growth stunting and early death, experts warned ...

Turning plants into meat-like foods to save the planet

Producing the savory, juicy steaks and pork chops that many people crave requires a lot of animals raised on huge, unsustainable amounts of plant protein. But what would happen if, instead of giving so much of it to animals ...

In chimpanzees, hunting and meat-eating is a man's business

(Phys.org) —Observations of hunting and meat eating in our closest living relatives, chimpanzees, suggest that regular inclusion of meat in the diet is not a characteristic unique to Homo. Wild chimpanzees are known to ...

Kittens: Their microbiomes are what they eat

For animals as well as people, diet affects what grows in the gut. The gut microbial colonies, also known as the gut microbiome, begin to form at birth. Their composition affects how the immune system develops and is linked ...

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