Zooming across the political divide

Social psychologists at UCLA have done what seems impossible, at least on the internet: getting liberals and conservatives to have meaningful and congenial political discussions.

Finding more in 'most': Scientific study of an everyday word

William Shakespeare, who knew a thing or two about words, advised that "An honest tale speeds best, being plainly told." But the exact meaning of plain language isn't always easy to find. Even simple words like "most" and ...

Do subtitled films really help you learn languages?

In general, films in the original language and versions with subtitles in a range of different languages are both widely available in Europe. If the main aim of subtitles is allowing viewers to understand dialogue in films ...

Technique allows AI to learn words in the flow of dialogue

A group of researchers at Osaka University has developed a new method for dialogue systems. Lexical acquisition through implicit confirmation is a method for a computer to acquire the category of an unknown word over multiple ...

page 1 from 4

Dialogue

Dialogue (sometimes spelled dialog in American English) is a literary and theatrical form consisting of a written or spoken conversational exchange between two or more people.

Its chief historical origins as narrative, philosophical or didactic device are to be found in classical Greek and Indian literature, in particular in the ancient art of rhetoric.

Having lost touch almost entirely in the 19th century with its underpinnings in rhetoric, the notion of dialogue emerged transformed in the work of cultural critics such as Mikhail Bakhtin and Paulo Freire, theologians such as Martin Buber, as an existential palliative to counter atomization and social alienation in mass industrial society.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA