Related topics: photosynthesis

Bacteria could help to capture greenhouse gases

Carbon dioxide is an important molecule necessary for life on Earth. Trees need CO2 for photosynthesis, crops produce higher yields in its presence, and some bacteria can transform it into food. The molecule is even an important ...

With better algal forecasts comes safer water

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and collaborators have used a new technique to better forecast the level of algal toxins that accumulate in Lake Erie every year.

New insight on the source/sink balance of cyanobacteria

A new study from the Michigan State University-DOE Plant Research Laboratory (PRL) brings fresh insight on the source/sink balance of cyanobacteria and paves the way for further advancements in photosynthetic microbes for ...

A fresh view of microbial life in Yellowstone's hot springs

Yellowstone National Park is home to more than 10,000 hydrothermal features. The park's hot springs, geysers, mud pots, and fumaroles are home to trillions of heat-loving microbes. For photosynthetic biofilms, the rule of ...

page 1 from 17

Cyanobacteria

The taxonomy is currently under revision

Chroococcales (suborders-Chamaesiphonales and Pleurocapsales)

Nostocales (= Hormogonales or Oscillatoriales)

Stigonematales

Cyanobacteria (English pronunciation: /saɪˌænoʊbækˈtɪəriə/; also known as blue-green algae, blue-green bacteria, and Cyanophyta) is a phylum of bacteria that obtain their energy through photosynthesis. The name "cyanobacteria" comes from the color of the bacteria (Greek: κυανός (kyanós) = blue).

The ability of cyanobacteria to perform oxygenic photosynthesis is thought to have converted the early reducing atmosphere into an oxidizing one, which dramatically changed the composition of life forms on Earth by stimulating biodiversity and leading to the near-extinction of oxygen-intolerant organisms. According to endosymbiotic theory, chloroplasts in plants and eukaryotic algae have evolved from cyanobacterial ancestors via endosymbiosis.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA