Related topics: photosynthesis

Cyanobacteria as 'green' catalysts in biotechnology

Researchers from TU Graz and Ruhr University Bochum show in the journal ACS Catalysis how the catalytic activity of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can be significantly increased. This brings biotechnological ...

New candidate for raw material synthesis through gene transfer

Cyanobacteria hardly need any nutrients and use the energy of sunlight. Bathers are familiar with these microorganisms—often incorrectly called "blue-green algae"—as they often occur in waters. A group of researchers ...

Parasitic fungi keep harmful blue-green algae in check

When a lake is covered with green scum during a warm summer, cyanobacteria—often called blue-green algae—are usually involved. Mass development of such cyanobacteria is bad for water quality because they can deprive the ...

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Cyanobacteria

The taxonomy is currently under revision

Chroococcales (suborders-Chamaesiphonales and Pleurocapsales)

Nostocales (= Hormogonales or Oscillatoriales)

Stigonematales

Cyanobacteria (English pronunciation: /saɪˌænoʊbækˈtɪəriə/; also known as blue-green algae, blue-green bacteria, and Cyanophyta) is a phylum of bacteria that obtain their energy through photosynthesis. The name "cyanobacteria" comes from the color of the bacteria (Greek: κυανός (kyanós) = blue).

The ability of cyanobacteria to perform oxygenic photosynthesis is thought to have converted the early reducing atmosphere into an oxidizing one, which dramatically changed the composition of life forms on Earth by stimulating biodiversity and leading to the near-extinction of oxygen-intolerant organisms. According to endosymbiotic theory, chloroplasts in plants and eukaryotic algae have evolved from cyanobacterial ancestors via endosymbiosis.

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