How the 'Kimchi premium' on crypto affects overseas remittances

The "Kimchi premium" is a term used to refer to the gap between the price of bitcoins in South Korean versus Western exchanges. This difference, which was first observed in 2016, is caused due to the high demand for a limited ...

Stock market returns track the strength of the dollar

A new paper in Oxford Open Economics, published by Oxford University Press, shows that the US dollar can be considered as a major global factor that investors look at when making their portfolio allocation decisions in stock ...

Decrypting cryptocurrencies

Cryptocurrencies have been treated as a financial terra incognita—they have enjoyed growing interest but also raised concerns due to their virtuality. The use of statistical methods utilizing correlation matrices to analyze ...

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Currency

In economics, currency refers to a generally accepted medium of exchange. These are usually the coins and banknotes of a particular government, which comprise the physical aspects of a nation's money supply. The other part of a nation's money supply consists of bank deposits (sometimes called deposit money), ownership of which can be transferred by means of cheques, debit cards, or other forms of money transfer. Deposit money and currency are money in the sense that both are acceptable as a means of payment.

Money in the form of currency has predominated in human civilizations from about 10,000 BCE on. Usually (gold or silver) coins of intrinsic value (commodity money) have been the norm. However, nearly all contemporary money systems are based on fiat money – modern currency has value only by government order (fiat). Usually, the government declares the fiat currency (typically notes and coins issued by the central bank) to be legal tender, making it unlawful to not accept the fiat currency as a means of repayment for all debts, public and private.

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