Cryptography without using secret keys

Most security applications, for instance, access to buildings or digital signatures, use cryptographic keys that must at all costs be kept secret. That also is the weak link: Who will guarantee that the key doesn't get stolen ...

PlayStation 3 hack is decryption jolt for Sony

(Phys.org)—This week brings more bad security news for Sony. The unlocking of a console, called jailbreaking, is a way that the jailbreakers get to fulfill their wishes to customize their console to run their own code and ...

Making quantum encryption practical

One of the many promising applications of quantum mechanics in the information sciences is quantum key distribution (QKD), in which the counterintuitive behavior of quantum particles guarantees that no one can eavesdrop on ...

Mobile tech 'can replace cheques'

(PhysOrg.com) -- With cheques due to be phased out in the UK by 2018 new security technology developed at Oxford University could offer a replacement, allowing people a secure way to pay in almost any situation.

Beefing up public-key encryption

Most financial transactions on the Internet are safeguarded by a cryptographic technique called public-key encryption. Where traditional encryption relies on a single secret key, shared by both sender and recipient, public-key ...

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