Crowdsourcing speeds up earthquake monitoring

Data produced by internet users can help to speed up the detection of earthquakes. Fast and accurate information is essential in the case of earthquakes: Epicentre location, depth and magnitude are minimum requirements to ...

Social media provides critical information missed by FEMA

Social media sites can be a valuable tool for assessing the impact of natural disasters like Hurricane Harvey, but a new report indicates much of the critical information conveyed by those sites is overlooked by federal authorities.

Crowdsourcing predicts new product success

Evaluating the commercial potential for new product designs is challenging – think drop-crotch pants or gold sneakers – who knew they'd be a hit? But new research reveals crowdsourcing could be the key to helping companies ...

In sea of satellite images, experts' eyes still needed

The Islamic State group destroyed a sixth-century Christian monastery in Iraq in 2014, a fact confirmed last week by studying satellite images. The cultural loss is significant and is being widely lamented.

Crowdsourcing used in Genghis Khan tomb search

Researchers from the University of California San Diego have written "Crowdsourcing the Unknown: The Satellite Search for Genghis Khan," published last month on PLOS ONE, the peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication. ...

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Crowdsourcing

Crowdsourcing is the act of sourcing tasks traditionally performed by specific individuals to a group of people or community (crowd) through an open call.

Jeff Howe established that the concept of crowdsourcing depends essentially on the fact that because it is an open call to a group of people, it gathers those who are most fit to perform tasks, solve complex problems and contribute with the most relevant and fresh ideas.

For example, the public may be invited to develop a new technology, carry out a design task (also known as community-based design or "design by democracy" and distributed participatory design), refine or carry out the steps of an algorithm (see human-based computation), or help capture, systematize or analyze large amounts of data (see also citizen science).

The term has become popular with businesses, authors, and journalists as shorthand for the trend of leveraging the mass collaboration enabled by Web 2.0 technologies to achieve business goals. However, both the term and its underlying business models have attracted controversy and criticisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA