Related topics: plants · drought · soil · climate change · biofuel

Artificial photosynthesis can produce food without sunshine

Photosynthesis has evolved in plants for millions of years to turn water, carbon dioxide, and the energy from sunlight into plant biomass and the foods we eat. This process, however, is very inefficient, with only about 1% ...

How fast-growing algae could enhance growth of food crops

A new study provides a framework to boost crop growth by incorporating a strategy adopted from a fast-growing species of green algae. The algae, known as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, contain an organelle called the pyrenoid ...

'Extreme' plants grow faster in the face of stress

When faced with conditions that are too dry, salty, or cold, most plants try to conserve resources. They send out fewer leaves and roots and close up their pores to hold in water. If circumstances don't improve, they eventually ...

New tools needed to prevent plant disease pandemics

Plant diseases don't stop at a nation's borders and miles of oceans don't prevent their spread, either. That's why plant disease surveillance, improved plant disease detection systems and predictive plant disease modeling—integrated ...

New wheat and barley genomes will help feed the world

An international research collaboration, including scientists from the University of Adelaide's Waite Research Institute, has unlocked new genetic variation in wheat and barley—a major boost for the global effort in breeding ...

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Crop

A crop is the annual or season's yield of any plant that is grown in significant quantities to be harvested as food, as livestock fodder, fuel, or for any other economic purpose. This category includes crop species as well as agricultural techniques related to cropping.

There are many types of crops that are used for industrial purposes. For example, crops are grown and harvested for the sole purpose of making profit and feeding people, as they are grown in large amounts in a certain area suitable for growing crops.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA