Some mammals shift their schedules in urban environments

When visiting cities, coyotes seem to prefer the nightlife while deer and squirrels would rather be home before dark. That's the finding of new research from University of Utah ("the U") scientists who found that mammals ...

Tree cover helps gray foxes coexist with coyotes in the country

As coyotes have spread outside their native range into the eastern United States, they've been known to harass and kill North Carolina's two native species of fox. A new study finds that preserving tree cover may be essential ...

Living peacefully with coyotes means respecting their boundaries

On average, three people per year are "attacked" (that means bitten or scratched) by coyotes across Canada. In comparison, an average of 180 Canadians per year are reportedly struck by lightening. Critically, 100 percent ...

Meet the new climate refugee in town: Coyotes

Amid the sylvan tranquility of the Berkeley hills neighborhood, an image of a snarling predator, fangs bared, stares down at passers-by from atop a pole planted in the yard of a sprawling Tudor-style home. "Danger! "Coyotes!" ...

Carnivore interactions are a game of risk and reward

Coyotes can eat by scavenging cougars' prey but it's a risky proposition as coyotes often end up killed by cougars too, a new study of predator interactions by Oregon State University shows.

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Coyote

The coyote (US: /kaɪˈoʊtiː/ or /ˈkaɪ.oʊt/, UK: /kɔɪˈjoʊteɪ/ or /kɔɪˈjoʊt/; Canis latrans), also known as the American jackal or the prairie wolf, is a species of canine found throughout North and Central America, ranging from Panama in the south, north through Mexico, the United States and Canada. It occurs as far north as Alaska and all but the northernmost portions of Canada.

There are currently 19 recognized subspecies, with 16 in Canada, Mexico and the United States, and 3 in Central America. Unlike its cousin the gray wolf, which is Eurasian in origin, evolutionary theory suggests the coyote evolved in North America during the Pleistocene epoch 1.81 million years ago alongside the Dire Wolf. Unlike the wolf, the coyote's range has expanded in the wake of human civilization, and coyotes readily reproduce in metropolitan areas.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA