Related topics: stress · stress hormones

Wolves howl because they care

When a member of the wolf pack leaves the group, the howling by those left behind isn't a reflection of stress but of the quality of their relationships. So say researchers based on a study of nine wolves from two packs living ...

Stress test: New study finds seals are stressed-out by sharks

While a little added stress may be helpful to flee a dangerous situation, or to meet an approaching deadline, it's no secret that prolonged exposure to the stress hormone cortisol is linked to health problems. So, what effects ...

You need to be a healthy to be a heart-throb: study

(PhysOrg.com) -- Men with strong immune systems are most attractive to members of the opposite sex according to a new study from the University of Abertay Dundee and partners.

Wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

The hormone cortisol rises and falls naturally throughout the day and can spike in response to stress, but current methods for measuring cortisol levels require waiting several days for results from a lab. By the time a person ...

Keeping time: Circadian clocks

Our planet was revolving on its axis, turning night into day every 24 hours, for 4.5 billion years - long before any form of life existed here. About a billion years later, the very first simple bacterial cells came into ...

Disposable cortisol biosensor developed

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists in the US have developed a disposable, non-invasive new biosensor to monitor levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, and say the ultrasensitive electrochemical impedance technique it uses could ...

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Cortisol

Cortisol is a corticosteroid hormone or glucocorticoid produced by the adrenal cortex, that is part of the adrenal gland (in the zona fasciculata and the zona reticularis of the adrenal cortex). It is usually referred to as the "stress hormone" as it is involved in response to stress and anxiety, controlled by CRH. It increases blood pressure and blood sugar, and reduces immune responses. Various synthetic forms of cortisol are used to treat a variety of different illnesses. The most well-known of these are a natural metabolic intermediary of cortisol named hydrocortisone. When first introduced as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, hydrocortisone was referred to as Compound E.

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