Automated disease detection in maize

Maize is perhaps the single, most-important cereal crop in the world. It is consumed by millions of people and is a staple for a large proportion of the global population. It is also used for animal feed and its total production ...

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar

Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not ...

One in five Australian honey samples adulterated

Following the recent high-profile fake honey scandal, new and independent research from Macquarie University in collaboration with the National Measurement Institute has unveiled, for the first time, the scale of the adulteration ...

How a protein could become the next big sweetener

High-fructose corn syrup and sugar are on the outs with calorie-wary consumers. As a result, low- and no-calorie alternatives have become popular, and soon, there could be another option that tastes more sugar-like than other ...

Mobile game teaches hard science

Honors chemistry and kinesiology senior Robbie Engler has taken a topic that even professors describe as sleep-inducing and turned it into a mobile game that will send students racing across campus on an educational treasure ...

Bittersweet: Bait-averse cockroaches shudder at sugar

Sugar isn't always sweet to German cockroaches, especially to the ones that avoid roach baits. In a study published May 24 in the journal Science, North Carolina State University entomologists show the neural mechanism behind ...

Why are bees and wasps so busy in autumn?

(Phys.org)—You buy a cider doughnut at the apple orchard and they quickly find you. Your kid opens a sports drink at the soccer field and they show up. You dine on the deck on a warm afternoon and sure enough, there they ...

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Corn syrup

Corn syrup is a syrup, made using cornstarch as a feedstock, and composed mainly of glucose. A series of two enzymatic reactions are used to convert the corn starch to corn syrup. Its major uses in commercially-prepared foods are as a thickener, sweetener, and for its moisture-retaining (humectant) properties which keep foods moist and help to maintain freshness.

Corn syrup is used to soften texture, add volume, prohibit crystallization and enhance flavour. Because cane sugar quotas raise the price of sugar in the United States, domestically produced corn syrup and high-fructose corn syrup are a less expensive alternative often used in American-made processed and mass-produced foods, candies, and sodas to help control costs.

The more general term glucose syrup is often used synonymously with corn syrup, since the former is most commonly made from corn starch. Technically, glucose syrup is any liquid starch hydrolysate of mono, di, and higher saccharides and can be made from any sources of starch; wheat, rice and potatoes are the most common sources.

Glucose (or dextrose) syrup is produced from number 2 yellow dent corn. When wet milled, approximately 2.3 litres of corn is required to yield an average of 947g of starch, to produce 1kg of glucose (or dextrose) syrup (a bushel of corn will yield an average of 31.5 pounds of starch, which in turn will yield about 33.3 pounds of syrup). Thus, it takes about 2,300 litres of corn to produce a tonne of glucose syrup (or 60 bushels of corn to produce one short ton).

The viscosity and sweetness of the syrup depends on the extent to which the hydrolysis reaction has been carried out. To distinguish different grades of syrup, they are rated according to their "dextrose equivalent" (DE).

Glucose syrup was the primary corn sweetener in the United States prior to the expansion of High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) production. HFCS is a variant in which other enzymes are used to convert some of the glucose into fructose. The resulting syrup is sweeter and more soluble. Corn syrup is also available as a retail product. The most popular retail corn syrup product in the United States is Karo Syrup, a fructose/glucose syrup.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA