A more efficient, safer alternative to sourcing copper via bacteria

Copper remains one of the single most ubiquitous metals in everyday life. As a conductor of heat and electricity, it is utilized in wires, roofing and plumbing, as well as a catalyst for petrochemical plants, solar and electrical ...

Petrovite: Scientists discover a new mineral in Kamchatka

For more than 40 years, researchers have been studying the mineralogy of scoria cones and lava flows of fumaroles in Kamchatka. The features were formed after two major eruptions of Tolbachik Volcano—in 1975-1976 and 2012-2013. ...

Ultrapure copper for an ultrasensitive dark matter detector

In February and March, three batches of copper plates arrived at Fermilab and were rushed into storage 100 meters underground. The copper had been mined in Finland, rolled into plates in Germany and shipped across land and ...

New 'smart' polymer glows brighter when stretched

Scientists from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have created a stress-detecting "smart" polymer that shines brighter when stretched. Researchers hope to use the new polymer to measure ...

Microscope prints patterns at the nanoscale

Researchers from AMOLF's 3-D-Photovoltaics group have used an atomic force microscope to electrochemically print at the nanoscale. This technique can print structures for a new generation of solar cells on chips. The researchers ...

Why some greens turn brown in historical paintings

Enticed by the brilliant green hues of copper acetate and copper resinate, some painters in the Renaissance period incorporated these pigments into their masterpieces. However, by the 18th century, most artists had abandoned ...

page 1 from 9