Gulf Stream intrusions feed diatom hot spots

The Gulf Stream, which has reliably channeled warm water from the tropics northward along the East Coast of North America for thousands of years, is changing. Recent research shows that it may be slowing down, and more and ...

Cooling red-hot steel with warm water

Ph.D. student Camila Gomez mimicked the cooling process of Tata Steel's blast furnaces in the lab and found out that it's better to cool with warmer water.

Going against the trend: Cooling in the Southern Ocean

Climate and marine scientists are observing pervasive warming of the ocean and land surfaces across the globe. Since the middle of the 19th century, the average global temperature recorded on the land surface has risen by ...

Turned-down temperatures boost crops' penchant for production

Drought and heat put stress on plants and reduce grain yield. For some farmers, irrigation is the answer. Many of us assume the practice boosts crop yields by delivering soil water, but it turns out irrigation's cooling effect ...

page 2 from 8