What makes an explanation good enough?

"If you look at the biggest and most divisive arguments we're having right now," says Simon DeDeo, SFI External Professor and Carnegie Mellon University Professor, "we often agree on the facts. We disagree on the explanations."

Social media use increases belief in COVID-19 misinformation

The more people rely on social media as their main news source the more likely they are to believe misinformation about the pandemic, according to a recent survey analysis by Washington State University researcher Yan Su.

The anatomy of a COVID-19 conspiracy theory

It's widely believed that social media conspiracy theories are driven by malicious and anonymous "bots" set up by shadowy third parties. But my new research – which examined an extremely successful COVID-19 conspiracy theory—has ...

The psychology of fake news

The brain can be untrustworthy when it comes to deciphering fake news, and especially when headlines are repeated, presented with photos, or generally easy to imagine, experts from The Australia National University (ANU) ...

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