Tone as important as truth to counter vaccine fake news

Lack of trust in health authorities, combined with the fear and uncertainty about the disease, created fertile ground for false rumors to spread about COVID-19 vaccines. Countering the rumors may be about attitude as well ...

New flood maps clarify the risk homeowners face

Flooding in urban areas cost Americans more than $106 billion between 1960 and 2016, damaging property, disrupting businesses and claiming lives in the process. Determining which areas are most likely to flood amid ever-changing ...

Survey: Trust in science is becoming more polarized

Political divisions on confidence in the scientific and medical communities have widened, according to an analysis of the 2021 General Social Survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The survey, ...

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Confidence

Confidence is generally described as a state of being certain either that a hypothesis or prediction is correct or that a chosen course of action is the best or most effective. Self-confidence is having confidence in oneself. Arrogance or hubris in this comparison, is having unmerited confidence—believing something or someone is capable or correct when they are not. Overconfidence or presumptuousness is excessive belief in someone (or something) succeeding, without any regard for failure. Scientifically, a situation can only be judged after the aim has been achieved or not. Confidence can be a self-fulfilling prophecy as those without it may fail or not try because they lack it and those with it may succeed because they have it rather than because of an innate ability.

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