Eliminating cracks in 3-D-printed metal components

Researchers at EPFL have developed a new laser 3-D-printing technique to manufacture metal components with unprecedented resistance to high temperature, damage and corrosion. The method has applications in fields ranging ...

Nanoscience—Insect-inspired motion sensing

Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory took inspiration from flying insects to demonstrate a miniaturized gyroscope, a special sensor used in navigation technologies.

Cooking up a new theory for better accelerators

While particle accelerators may be on the cutting edge of science, the building and preparation of some particle accelerator components has long been more of an art form, dependent on recipes born of trial and error. Now, ...

Opening up the black box of heterogeneous catalysis

Researchers from ICIQ's López group present a new method that allows for the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts. After applying principal component analysis and regression (PCA) to the adsorption energies of 71 different ...

How to control friction in topological insulators

Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. Physicists at the University of Basel and the Istanbul Technical University have begun investigating ...

Vibration in one direction only

Electronic components such as transistors transmit electric currents in one direction only. What if we could create materials that could achieve similar effects for mechanical vibrations? For many applications, having materials ...

A novel composite for tensile strength

Materials scientists are always on the look out for new composites, materials comprising two or more different substances that combine to bring together the useful properties of each component and to overcome the limitations ...

Jumping the gap may make electronics faster

A quasi-particle that travels along the interface of a metal and dielectric material may be the solution to problems caused by shrinking electronic components, according to an international team of engineers.

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