Sharks are colour-blind: study

Sharks may be unable to distinguish between colours, according to a lab study published on Tuesday that could benefit swimmers, surfers and sharks themselves.

Frogs have unique ability to see color in the dark

The night vision of frogs and toads appears to be superior to that of all other animals. They have the ability to see colour even when it is so dark that humans are not able to see anything at all. This has been shown in ...

To avoid mantids, stinkbugs evolved to hide in plain sight

Did you know that the sky isn't actually blue? Perhaps in school you learned about how air scatters light, filtering out red light from the sun, but that is only half the story. While our eyes perceive a milky blue, a more ...

Making window glass visible – but only to birds

Ultraviolet patterns can make window glass visible to birds, thus preventing fatal collisions. However, it has now been shown that such windows are not likely to work for all species, but only for birds like small passerines, ...

Why are so many fairy-wrens blue?

(Phys.org)—Researchers have long tried to explain the enormous diversity in colour of birds, and a new study is giving insights into why the humble fairy-wren, a colourful Australian bird, is radiantly blue.

Colour vision makes birds of prey successful hunters

In many cases it is the colour of the prey that helps predatory birds to detect, pursue and capture them. In a new study, biologists at Lund University in Sweden show that the Harris's hawk has the best colour vision of all ...

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