Studying cellular deliveries

Many cells, including cancer cells, are known to secrete short RNAs in tiny vesicles, which then move inside other cells—potentially a form of cell-to-cell communication.

'Click chemistry' reactions may boost cancer-fighting drug potency

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a quick and easy way to simultaneously modify dozens of drugs or molecules to improve their disease-fighting properties. Using the approach, scientists exchanged ...

Colon cancer nuclear pore dynamics are captured by HS-AFM

One of the key reasons for cancer mortality is the highly invasive behaviour of cancer cells, which is often due to aggressive metastasis. Metastasis is facilitated by various growth factors and cytokines secreted from cells ...

Environmental enrichment triggers mouse wound repair response

Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports ...

'Molecular movie' opens door to new cancer treatments

An international team of scientists led by the University of Liverpool has produced a 'structural movie' revealing the step-by-step creation of an important naturally occurring chemical in the body that plays a role in some ...

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Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer, also called colon cancer or large bowel cancer, includes cancerous growths in the colon, rectum and appendix. With 655,000 deaths worldwide per year, it is the third most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. Many colorectal cancers are thought to arise from adenomatous polyps in the colon. These mushroom-shaped growths are usually benign, but some may develop into cancer over time. The majority of the time, the diagnosis of localized colon cancer is through colonoscopy. Therapy is usually through surgery, which in many cases is followed by chemotherapy.

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