Related topics: brain

Estimating the informativeness of data

Not all data are created equal. But how much information is any piece of data likely to contain? This question is central to medical testing, designing scientific experiments, and even to everyday human learning and thinking. ...

Our emotions and identity can affect how we use grammar

Language and social identity have been making headlines recently. Last month, Air Canada's CEO Michael Rousseau faced scrutiny over not knowing French—his language deficit is helping support Bill 96 in Québec (which seeks ...

Einstein was 'wrong,' not your science teacher

"Your teacher was wrong!" It's a phrase many a high school or university student has heard. As practicing and former science teachers, we have been challenged with this accusation before.

Study provides insight into how the brain may have evolved

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have uncovered evidence of an important genetic step in the evolution of the brain. The finding highlights how genetic events that took place in our fish-like ancestors ...

What makes an explanation good enough?

"If you look at the biggest and most divisive arguments we're having right now," says Simon DeDeo, SFI External Professor and Carnegie Mellon University Professor, "we often agree on the facts. We disagree on the explanations."

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Cognitive science

Cognitive science may be concisely defined as the study of the nature of intelligence. It draws on multiple empirical disciplines, including psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, linguistics, anthropology, computer science, sociology and biology. The term cognitive science was coined by Christopher Longuet-Higgins in his 1973 commentary on the Lighthill report, which concerned the then-current state of Artificial Intelligence research. In the same decade, the journal Cognitive Science and the Cognitive Science Society were founded. Cognitive science differs from cognitive psychology in that algorithms that are intended to simulate human behavior are implemented or implementable on a computer.

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