How bacteria can prevent coal ash spills

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a technique that uses bacteria to produce "biocement" in coal ash ponds, making the coal ash easier to store and limiting the risk of coal ash spills into surface ...

Could coal ash be a viable source of rare-earth metals?

Rare-earth elements, including neodymium and yttrium, are not actually rare – more common, in fact, in the Earth's crust than copper and tin. But, because they are scattered widely, and hard to separate from their surrounding ...

Cementless fly ash binder makes concrete 'green'

Rice University engineers have developed a composite binder made primarily of fly ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, that can replace Portland cement in concrete.

Arsenic in groundwater? Virginia coal ash case before court

Virginia's largest electric utility asked a federal appeals court Wednesday to overturn a judge's ruling that the company is violating federal law by discharging arsenic through groundwater into surrounding waters from a ...

Some Chinese coal ash too radioactive for reuse

Manufacturers are increasingly using encapsulated coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete, wallboard, bricks, roofing and other building materials. But a new study by U.S. and Chinese scientists ...

Renewable coal on the horizon

Coal fueled the Industrial Revolution, but it took eons to form. Now, a team of researchers at the University of Minnesota Duluth has introduced what might be called "instant coal": an energy-dense biofuel made from wood ...

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