In the future, everyone might use quantum computers

Computers were once considered high-end technology, only accessible to scientists and trained professionals. But there was a seismic shift in the history of computing during the second half of the 1970s. It wasn't just that ...

Probing quantum physics on a macroscopic scale

Why does quantum mechanics work so well for microscopic objects, yet macroscopic objects are described by classical physics? This question has bothered physicists since the development of quantum theory more than 100 years ...

Revealing the inner working of magnetic materials

Björn Alling, researcher in theoretical physics at Linköping University, has, together with his colleagues, completed the task given to him by the Swedish Research Council in the autumn of 2014: Find out what happens inside ...

Quantum speed limit may put brakes on quantum computers

Over the past five decades, standard computer processors have gotten increasingly faster. In recent years, however, the limits to that technology have become clear: Chip components can only get so small, and be packed only ...

Next-generation transport

For most of us, fluid dynamics and mechanics aren't particularly significant—that is, until we're white-knuckling it on a bumpy plane ride or trying to stay buoyant in unusually bubbly water. The way we navigate through ...

Into the quantum world with a tennis racket

Quantum technology is seen as an important future-oriented technology: smaller, faster and with higher performance than conventional electronics. However, exploiting quantum effects is difficult because nature's smallest ...

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