Related topics: sleep

Understanding the circadian clocks of individual cells

Two new studies led by UT Southwestern scientists outline how individual cells maintain their internal clocks, driven both through heritable and random means. These findings, published online May 1 in PNAS and May 27 in eLife, ...

Discovery of a drug to rescue winter depression-like behavior

A group of animal biologists and chemists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, has used a chemical genomics approach to explore the underlying mechanism of winter depression-like ...

NASA's ECOSTRESS mission sees plants 'waking up' from space

Although plants don't sleep in the same way humans do, they have circadian rhythms—internal clocks that, like our own internal clocks, tell them when it's night and when it's day. And like many people, plants are less active ...

What drives circadian rhythms in the polar regions?

In temperate latitudes, the right timing is crucial for almost all living things: Plants sprout with the advent of spring, bees know the best times to visit flowers, people get tired in the evening and wake up again in the ...

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Circadian rhythm

A circadian rhythm is a roughly-24-hour cycle in the biochemical, physiological or behavioral processes of living entities, including plants, animals, fungi and cyanobacteria (see bacterial circadian rhythms). The term "circadian", coined by Franz Halberg, comes from the Latin circa, "around," and diem or dies, "day", meaning literally "approximately one day." The formal study of biological temporal rhythms such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology.

Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated, and can be entrained by external cues, called Zeitgebers, the primary one of which is daylight. These rhythms allow organisms to anticipate and prepare for precise and regular environmental changes.

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