How cells build different antennae to sense their surroundings

Cells communicate with each other and with the environment using tiny antennae, called cilia, that emit and receive signals, including sound, smell and light information. Some of these antennae can also move, and are altered ...

Scientists develop method to tweak tiny 'antenna' on cells

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan say they have found a fast way to manipulate a cell's cilia, the tiny, fingerlike protrusions that "feel" and sense their microscopic environment. ...

Key protein in sperm tail assembly identified

A study published in the Journal of Cell Biology focuses on the development of the sperm tail, the structure that enables sperm cells to swim and is therefore critical for male fertility.

Key polarity protein uncovered

Northwestern Medicine scientists have identified a protein called CLAMP as crucial to a mechanism that organizes cells and allows some to perform specialized functions, according to a study published in the Journal of Cell ...

New research linking cancer-inhibiting proteins to cell antennae

Danish researchers have just presented a previously unknown mechanism that inhibits the ability of cells to develop into cancer cells. Their findings have important implications for the understanding of how cancer starts, ...

Cilia: 'The bouncer' of bacteria

Imagine a club sceneā€”a bouncer at a velvet rope selects which individuals get into the club. This, explains Eva Kanso, a professor of mechanical engineering at USC Viterbi School of Engineering, is what cilia do in an organism. ...

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