How cells zip through the stickiest mucus

A team led by Johns Hopkins University engineers figured out how and why human cells move much faster through thick mucus than thinner varieties. People sick with certain diseases, including asthma and COVID-19, secrete mucus ...

Smoke from wildfires ages in the atmosphere

Emissions, like smoke from wildfires and exhaust from vehicles, go through chemical changes when they enter the atmosphere. New research from the University of Georgia shows, for the first time, that these changes may affect ...

New bioink brings 3D-printing of human organs closer to reality

Researchers at Lund University have designed a new bioink which allows small human-sized airways to be 3D-bioprinted with the help of patient cells for the first time. The 3D-printed constructs are biocompatible and support ...

Study the effect of long-term oxygen deficiency

Researchers at Luleå University of Technology have developed a method to study how muscle cells in the blood vessels of the lung permanently contract because of long-term oxygen deficiency. This phenomenon leads to increased ...

S.African green groups sue government over air pollution

Two South African environmental groups are suing the government over air pollution in the northeastern province of Mpumalanga, where 83 percent of the country's coal is mined, their lawyer said Monday.

Breathing better may be an added benefit of biodiversity

A Forest Service study of nearly 50,000 children in New Zealand has found that those who live in greener neighborhoods are less likely to develop asthma. However, not all greenness is a good thing—children living in areas ...

This US wildfire season is among the worst: Here's why

Acrid yellow smoke clogs the skies of major Western U.S. cities, a human-caused fire in the Columbia River Gorge rains ash on Portland, Oregon, and a century-old backcountry chalet burns to the ground in Montana's Glacier ...

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