Identifying vintage wines by their chemical signature

Does every wine carry its own chemical signature and, if so, can this be used to identify its origin? Many specialists have tried to solve this mystery, without fully succeeding. By applying artificial intelligence tools ...

Unlocking the mystery of skin cracking in chili peppers

The outermost epidermal cell layer of fleshy fruit is surrounded by a hydrophobic cuticle, notably thicker than that found on vegetative tissues. This cuticle, primarily composed of the cutin polymer, also contains waxes ...

Pinpointing the emergence of muddy flavors in fish

Many people have experienced a muddy off-flavor in farmed fish. While the aquaculture industry has known about the problem for 20 years, it continues to impact the consumption of otherwise healthy and potentially sustainable ...

AI 'nose' predicts smells from molecular structures

In a major breakthrough, scientists have built a tool to predict the odor profile of a molecule, just based on its structure. It can identify molecules that look different but smell the same, as well as molecules that look ...

Studying the specific carbohydrates in Polygonatum sibiricum

In a study published in the journal Food Quality and Safety, researchers from Zhejiang University have unveiled significant findings about the carbohydrate composition of Polygonatum sibiricum, a renowned traditional Chinese ...

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Chromatography

Chromatography (from Greek χρῶμα chroma "color" and γράφειν graphein "to write") is the collective term for a set of laboratory techniques for the separation of mixtures. The mixture is dissolved in a fluid called the "mobile phase", which carries it through a structure holding another material called the "stationary phase". The various constituents of the mixture travel at different speeds, causing them to separate. The separation is based on differential partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases. Subtle differences in a compound's partition coefficient result in differential retention on the stationary phase and thus changing the separation.

Chromatography may be preparative or analytical. The purpose of preparative chromatography is to separate the components of a mixture for further use (and is thus a form of purification). Analytical chromatography is done normally with smaller amounts of material and is for measuring the relative proportions of analytes in a mixture. The two are not mutually exclusive.

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