Related topics: plant cell

New approach can add diversity to crop species without breeding GMOs

Breeding better crops through genetic engineering has been possible for decades, but the use of genetically modified plants has been limited by technical challenges and popular controversies. A new approach potentially solves ...

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Chloroplast

Chloroplasts (English pronunciation: /ˈklɒrəplæsts/) are organelles found in plant cells and other eukaryotic organisms that conduct photosynthesis. Chloroplasts capture light energy to conserve free energy in the form of ATP and reduce NADP to NADPH through a complex set of processes called photosynthesis.

Chloroplasts are green because they contain the chlorophyll pigment. The word chloroplast (χλωροπλάστης) is derived from the Greek words chloros (χλωρός), which means green, and plastis (πλάστης), which means "the one who forms". Chloroplasts are members of a class of organelles known as plastids.

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