Chlorophyll fluorescence illuminates plant function

Chlorophyll, the green pigment found in plants and algae, emits faint red and far-red light when illuminated during photosynthesis. This so called chlorophyll-a fluorescence conveys information about the instantaneous rate ...

First worldwide view of a key phytoplankton proxy

From vast, swirling blooms to minuscule populations, photosynthetic phytoplankton drifting near the surface of the ocean are often captured in snapshots from chlorophyll-detecting satellites. However, phytoplankton at greater ...

Satellites highlight a 30-year rise in ocean acidification

Oceans play a vital role in taking the heat out of climate change, but at a cost. New research supported by ESA and using different satellite measurements of various aspects of seawater along with measurements from ships ...

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Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll (also chlorophyl) is a green pigment found in almost all plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Its name is derived from the Greek words χλωρος, chloros ("green") and φύλλον, phyllon ("leaf"). Chlorophyll is an extremely important biomolecule, critical in photosynthesis, which allows plants to obtain energy from light. Chlorophyll absorbs light most strongly in the blue portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, followed by the red portion. However, it is a poor absorber of green and near-green portions of the spectrum, hence the green color of chlorophyll-containing tissues. Chlorophyll was first isolated by Joseph Bienaimé Caventou and Pierre Joseph Pelletier in 1817.

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