A late-night disco in the forest reveals tree performance

In 2017, the group from the Optics of Photosynthesis Lab (OPL) developed a new method to measure a small but important signal produced by all plants, and in this case trees. This signal is called chlorophyll fluorescence ...

Seeking disorder as a catalyst for change

Green chemists dream of replicating the reactions of photosynthesis. Of the possible outcomes, one of the most talked about is the ability to make affordable hydrogen fuels from water. In theory, the only by-product of burning ...

How plants bind their green pigment chlorophyll

Chlorophyll is the pigment used by all plants for photosynthesis. There are two versions, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b. These are structurally very similar to one another but have different colors, blue-green and yellowish ...

Was life on the early Earth purple?

Early life forms on Earth may have been able to generate metabolic energy from sunlight using a purple-pigmented molecule called retinal that possibly predates the evolution of chlorophyll and photosynthesis. If retinal has ...

Unpacking a secret of photosynthesis

Researchers at University of Stavanger have brought us one step closer to solving the fundamental question how plants build the photosynthetic machinery.

Lightening up soybean leaves may boost food supply

A new university-led study has shown that lightening the color of soybean leaves may increase the growth and yield of this major world food crop. The finding offers a strategy to help address Earth's future food needs.

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Chlorophyll

Chlorophyll (also chlorophyl) is a green pigment found in almost all plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Its name is derived from the Greek words χλωρος, chloros ("green") and φύλλον, phyllon ("leaf"). Chlorophyll is an extremely important biomolecule, critical in photosynthesis, which allows plants to obtain energy from light. Chlorophyll absorbs light most strongly in the blue portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, followed by the red portion. However, it is a poor absorber of green and near-green portions of the spectrum, hence the green color of chlorophyll-containing tissues. Chlorophyll was first isolated by Joseph Bienaimé Caventou and Pierre Joseph Pelletier in 1817.

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