Warming may promote spread of invasive blue catfish

A study by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science suggests that continued warming of Atlantic coastal waters may enhance the spread of invasive blue catfish within the Chesapeake Bay and other ...

New study reveals biodiversity important at regional scales

New research shows that biodiversity is important not just at the traditional scale of short-term plot experiments—in which ecologists monitor the health of a single meadow, forest grove, or pond after manipulating its ...

Urban development reduces flash flooding chances in arid West

Urban development in the eastern United States results in an increase in flash flooding in nearby streams, but in the arid West, urbanization has just the opposite effect, according to a Penn State researcher, who suggests ...

Team uncovers new molecule with big implications

Almost 20 years ago, the University of Delaware's Tom Hanson started studying the bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (Cba. tepidum), an organism that only lives in volcanic hot springs, to understand how it captures energy from ...

How Chesapeake Bay bacteria snack on sunlight

The Chesapeake Bay is known for its blue crabs, but those crustaceans are far outnumbered by much tinier residents: bacteria. Every milliliter of bay water is home to thousands to millions of these marine microbes, critical ...

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