Cornell model helps dairy farms reduce nitrogen, save money

The Chesapeake Bay—about 235 miles down the Susquehanna River from New York's Southern Tier—and other waterways might grow cleaner, thanks to new updates and improvements in a Cornell dairy nutrition model.

Team uncovers new molecule with big implications

Almost 20 years ago, the University of Delaware's Tom Hanson started studying the bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (Cba. tepidum), an organism that only lives in volcanic hot springs, to understand how it captures energy from ...

How Chesapeake Bay bacteria snack on sunlight

The Chesapeake Bay is known for its blue crabs, but those crustaceans are far outnumbered by much tinier residents: bacteria. Every milliliter of bay water is home to thousands to millions of these marine microbes, critical ...

Summer dead zones in Chesapeake Bay breaking up earlier

A new study shows that dead zones in the lower Chesapeake Bay are beginning to break up earlier in the fall, which may be an indication that efforts to reduce nutrient pollution to the Bay are beginning to make an impact. ...

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