Related topics: energy · photosynthesis · fuel cell

Power stations driven by light

Green plants, algae and some bacteria use sunlight to convert energy. The pigments in chlorophyll absorb electromagnetic radiation, which induces chemical reactions in electrons. These reactions take place in the nucleus ...

New catalysts for better fuel cells

Researchers at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology (DGIST) have developed nano-catalysts that can reduce the overall cost of clean energy fuel cells, according to a study published in the journal of Applied ...

Yeast makes ethanol to prevent metabolic overload

Why do some yeast cells produce ethanol? Scientists have wondered about this apparent waste of resources for decades. Now, University of Groningen scientists think they have a solution: yeast cells produce ethanol as a 'safety ...

Powerful X-ray beams unlock secrets of nanoscale crystal formation

High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup allowed researchers to watch a high-pressure, high-temperature chemical reaction to determine for the first time what controls formation of two different nanoscale crystalline ...

Illuminating nanoparticle growth with X-rays

Hydrogen fuel cells are a promising technology for producing clean and renewable energy, but the cost and activity of their cathode materials is a major challenge for commercialization. Many fuel cells require expensive platinum-based ...

'Frozen' copper behaves as noble metal in catalysis: study

As a non-noble metal, copper oxidizes more easily to a positive valence (Cu+ or Cu2+) than same-family elements Au or Ag. In general, this chemical property is mainly determined by electron structure. Can we change the chemical ...

Chemical bond versus electromagnetic waves

Vibrating carbon monoxide molecules adsorbed at the surface of a salt crystal stop moving after a few milliseconds. Scientists now discovered this is dominantly due to the emission of electromagnetic waves. The role of the ...

On the cusp of valleytronics

Research into harnessing two-dimensional (2-D) materials for everyday devices has had some ups and downs. However, the emerging field of valleytronics is using energy troughs to offer renewed potential.

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