Related topics: energy · photosynthesis · fuel cell

Using renewable electricity for industrial hydrogenation reactions

From the design of improved batteries to the use of solar and wind power for commodity chemical production, the University of Pittsburgh's James McKone ways that chemical engineering can make the world more sustainable. That's ...

New center to replace oil and gas with sustainable chemistry

Many of the things that surround us are chemically derived from fossil gas and oil—from washing powders to phones to pharmaceuticals. As such, chemistry contributes to CO2 emissions in the same way as, for example, flying ...

How the colon prioritizes gas detox over energy use

Onions, cabbage, garlic. While nutritious, eating these foods can lead to an embarrassing side effect: smelly flatulence. More than just smelly, hydrogen sulfide, the chemical compound responsible for the rotten-egg aroma, ...

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Chemical thermodynamics

Chemical thermodynamics is the study of the interrelation of heat and work with chemical reactions or with physical changes of state within the confines of the laws of thermodynamics. Chemical thermodynamics involves not only laboratory measurements of various thermodynamic properties, but also the application of mathematical methods to the study of chemical questions and the spontaneity of processes.

The structure of chemical thermodynamics is based on the first two laws of thermodynamics. Starting from the first and second laws of thermodynamics, four equations called the "fundamental equations of Gibbs" can be derived. From these four, a multitude of equations, relating the thermodynamic properties of the thermodynamic system can be derived using relatively simple mathematics. This outlines the mathematical framework of chemical thermodynamics.

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