Human gut microbes could make processed foods healthier

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis sheds light on how human gut microbes break down processed foods—especially potentially harmful chemical changes often produced during modern food manufacturing ...

Methane emissions spike: Is there one main culprit?

The level of methane in the atmosphere has risen dramatically in the last decade—and climate scientists are worried. Although there's still roughly 60 times less of it floating around than carbon dioxide, the gas heats ...

Minor genetic change creates unattractive female moths

Sex pheromones are chemical compounds released by an organism to attract potential mates. For moths in particular these sex pheromones are very important for mate recognition, as they rely completely on scent signal rather ...

International team of physicists continues search for new physics

Dark matter, which is thought to account for nearly a quarter of matter in the universe (but has yet to be observed), has perplexed physicists for decades. They're constantly looking for something surprising to show up in ...

Scorpion venom to shuttle drugs into the brain

The Peptides and Proteins lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a paper in Chemical Communications describing the use of a peptide derived from chlorotoxin, found in scorpion venom ...

Chimpanzees sniff out strangers and family members

Chemical communication is widely used in the animal kingdom to convey social information. For example, animals use olfactory cues to recognize group or family members, or to choose genetically suitable mates. In contrast ...

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