Rare birth of Asiatic cheetah cubs in Iran

An Asiatic cheetah gave birth to three "healthy" cubs in Iran, the head of the environment department said Sunday, calling it a first in captivity for the endangered species.

Has the wildlife 'Red List' let Africa's big cats down?

Lions and cheetahs are closer to extinction than the authoritative Red List of Threatened Species suggests, according to conservation scientists who warn that sharp drops in populations could be going undetected.

A speedy trial: What it takes to be the fastest land predator

What makes cheetah the fastest land mammal? Why aren't other animals, such as horses, as fast? While we haven't yet figured out why, we have some idea about how—cheetahs, as it turns out, make use of a galloping gait at ...

Why India's plan to reintroduce cheetahs may run into problems

A nature reserve in India could soon be the only location in the world to host wild populations of four major big cat species—tiger, lion, leopard and cheetah. Kuno-Palpur, in central state of Madhya Pradesh, may not be ...

Avoiding cheetah hangouts helps ranchers protect calves

On the dusty savannahs of Namibia, one of the last strongholds of cheetah populations on Earth, conflicts between cattle ranchers and big cats threaten the survival of the embattled carnivores.

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Cheetah

See text.

The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is a large-sized feline (family Felidae) inhabiting most of Africa and parts of the Middle East. The cheetah is the only extant member of the genus Acinonyx, most notable for modifications in the species' paws. As such, it is the only felid with non-retractable claws and pads that, by their scope, disallow gripping (therefore cheetahs cannot climb vertical trees, although they are generally capable of reaching easily accessible branches). The cheetah, however, achieves by far the fastest land speed of any living animal—between 112 and 120 km/h (70 and 75 mph) in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m (1,600 ft), and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to over 100 km/h (62 mph) in three seconds.

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