How yeast cells detect genetic infections

ETH researchers studying yeast cells have discovered a new mechanism for detecting foreign genetic material from pathogens or environmental contamination, and rendering it harmless.

Research signals arrival of a complete human genome

It's been nearly two decades since a UC Santa Cruz research team announced that they had assembled and posted the first human genome sequence on the internet. Despite the passage of time, enormous gaps remain in our genomic ...

How chromosomes 'cheat' for the chance to get into an egg

Each of your cells contains two copies of 23 chromosomes, one inherited from your father and one from your mother. Theoretically, when you create a gamete—a sperm or an egg—each copy has a 50-50 shot at being passed on. ...

Mixing and matching yeast DNA

Osaka University scientists show molecular factors that determine why some regions in yeast chromosomes are apt for remodeling, while other regions stay faithful during cell replication.

Scientists discover how crucial DNA sequences endure

As cells divide, some of their DNA is rearranged, spurring the emergence of new traits that can dictate whether a species survives or flounders. But some stretches of DNA appear to be so crucial to the basic functioning of ...

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