Related topics: cells · immune response · cancer cells · protein

Watch how cells squeeze through channels

Observations of cells moving through small channels shed new light on cell migration in 3-D environments, researchers report October 6 in Biophysical Journal. The findings also reveal how cancer cells may penetrate tissues ...

Study finds how body cells move within a tissue

A new mathematical model may explain how body cells get their shapes and what makes them move within a tissue. The model provides fundamental knowledge for applications in tissue engineering, amongst other things. Publication ...

Giant nanomachine aids the immune system

Cells that are infected by a virus or carry a carcinogenic mutation, for example, produce proteins foreign to the body. Antigenic peptides resulting from the degradation of these exogenous proteins inside the cell are loaded ...

Cells communicate by doing the 'wave'

Cells work around the clock to deliver, maintain, and control every aspect of life. And just as with humans, communication is a key to their success.

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Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

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