Related topics: cells · immune response · cancer cells · protein

The growth of an organism rides on a pattern of waves

When an egg cell of almost any sexually reproducing species is fertilized, it sets off a series of waves that ripple across the egg's surface. These waves are produced by billions of activated proteins that surge through ...

New technique tracks individual protein movement on live cells

The piece of gold that Richard Taylor was thrilled to track down weighed less than a single bacterium. Taylor, a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute, was working to follow individual nanogold-labeled molecules ...

Molecular motors direct the fate of stem cells

Scientists at the University of Groningen and the University Medical Center Groningen used molecular motors to manipulate the protein matrix on which bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are grown. Rotating motors altered ...

The roughening of a platinum electrode

Smooth platinum electrodes roughen and wear when subjected to repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction, which causes nanometer scale mounds to grow. Leiden chemists Leon Jacobse and Mark Koper, together with physicist Marcel ...

Visualizing every step of on-surface cycloaddition reactions

By observing individual atoms as they rearrange themselves step by step, chemists at RIKEN have cast new light on the route by which halogenated aromatic molecules join together on a silver surface1. These insights promise ...

page 1 from 32

Receptor (biochemistry)

In biochemistry, a receptor is a protein molecule, embedded in either the plasma membrane or cytoplasm of a cell, to which a mobile signaling (or "signal") molecule may attach. A molecule which binds to a receptor is called a "ligand," and may be a peptide (such as a neurotransmitter), a hormone, a pharmaceutical drug, or a toxin, and when such binding occurs, the receptor undergoes a conformational change which ordinarily initiates a cellular response. However, some ligands merely block receptors without inducing any response (e.g. antagonists). Ligand-induced changes in receptors result in physiological changes which constitute the biological activity of the ligands.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA